Discipline. speed. results.

Summary

Michael A. Anthony, P.E.
Co-founded the technical standards advocacy capability of the $300 billion education and university-affiliated health care facilities industry in the US.

Produces results in economic spaces too technical for political experts and too political for technical experts.

Since 1996 has led a growing network of technical, economic and legal subject matter experts in leveraging the economic footprint of the education facilities industry to add value to every educational institution and university-affiliated health care system in the United States with assertive engagement in international technical standards and open-source development processes. This network responds smartly to technical concepts advanced by others and drives original safety and sustainability concepts into infrastructure markets where the education industry is a significant stakeholder.

Timeline

  1. -
    Team Member, American National Standards Institute Company Member Forum Leadership Team

    The team includes ANSI Company members from a variety of sectors and industries including the Education Sector.

  2. -
    Chairman | IEEE Education & Healthcare Committee, IEEE

    http://sites.ieee.org/icps-ehe/

  3. -
    Fire Protection Research Foundation | Electrical A, NFPA
  4. -
    Liaison US Technical Advisory Group ISO/TC 267 Int, University of Michigan
  5. -
    Participating Member on ANSI US Technical Advisory, International Organization for Standardization TC/ISO 268 - Sustainable communities and cities

    Standardization in the field of Sustainable Cities and Communities will include the development of requirements, frameworks, guidance and supporting techniques and tools related to the achievement of sustainable development considering smartness and resilience, to help all Cities and Communities and their interested parties in both rural and urban areas become more sustainable.

    Note: TC 268 will contribute to the UN Sustainable Development Goals through its standardization work.

    The proposed series of International Standards will encourage the development and implementation of holistic and integrated approaches to sustainable development and sustainability.

  6. -
    Member: US National Committee for IEC SG6: Electro, American National Standards Institute
  7. -
    Senior Manager of Infrastructure Standards Strateg, University of Michigan
  8. -
    Principal, National Electrical Code Making Panel 1, University of Michigan

    The education facilities industry's first directed vote on any ANSI technical committee.

  9. -
    Author, McGraw-Hill

    Electrical and Energy Engineering Textbooks
    Contributor to "Engineering-News-Record"

  10. -
    Co-Chairman of the 2016 Industrial & Commercial Po, IEEE Standards Association

    http://sites.ieee.org/icps2016/

  11. Founder | Standards Michigan Group

Proudest Accomplishment

Catalyzing trade assocation standards advocacy enterprises for the US education facilities industry

Experience Highlights

  • Founder | Standards Michigan Group
    streaming advocacy for the final fiduciary in public infrastructure markets (present)
  • Senior Manager | @StandardsUMich
    advocate in infrastructure regulations for the university of michigan (1996-2016)
  • Chairman | Education & Healthcare Facility Electrotechnology Committee
    IEEE subcommittee under industrial applications society (present)
  • Member USNC IEC  | IEC SyC Smart Cities Committee
    US National Committee to the international electrotechnical commission (present)
  • Member ANSI US TAG | ISO 268 Sustainable cities and communities
    ANSI Technical advisory group administered by nfpa international (present)
  • Member | National Electrical Code
    tECHNICAL COMMITTEE MEMBER FOR EDUCATION FACILITIES INDUSTRY {present}
  • Member | Electrical Safety Advisory Council
    nfpa international | fire protection research foundation (present)
  • Observer | NSF 426 Environmental Standard for Servers
    standard co-developed by ieee, nsf international and green electronics council (present)
  • Observer | ISO 288 Education organizations management systems
    collaborating with ansi to advocate for a us technical advisory group convenor (present)
  • Member ANSI US TAG | ISO 304 Healthcare administration
    early adopter and supporter of university of texas as convenor of ansi us tag (present)
  • Member ANSI US TAG | ISO 260 Human resource management
    EARLY ADOPTER OF UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AS CONVENOR OF ANSI US TAG (present)
  • Catalyst | APPA Leadership in Education ANSI Standards for Total Cost of Ownership
    University of michigan plant operations recommendations and guidiance was adopted (job complete)
  • Catalyst | Simon Institute ANSI Standards
    University of michigan plant operations recommendations and guidance was adopted (job complete)
  • Member ANSI US TAG | ISO 192 Gas turbines
    advocacy for final fiduciary in central element in campus district energy systems (present)
  • Regulations.GOV
    mastery of e-goverment regulatory procesess of nearly all  federal and state agencies
  • Researchgate.NET
    since 2014: 3 papers, 468 reads, 3 citations
  • Senior Electrical Engineer | University of Michigan
    1982-2007 | power system planning, design construction & operation of 200 mva campus
  • Member | IEEE Forensics Committee
    Leading practice discovery for electrical engineers engaged in litigation & policy support (present)

Education Highlights

  • University of Michigan
    b.a. (1983) and b.s.e. (1988)
  • Michigan State University
    graduate studies in electrical engineering
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    GRADUATE STUDIES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
  • Harvard University
    undergraduate studies

Causes

  • DISCIPLINE
    PRIMARY FOCUS ON ADVOCATING THE EDUCATION FACILITIES INDUSTRY FINAL FIDUCIARY INTEREST
  • SPEED
    VAST NETWORK OF LIKE-MINDED STAKEHOLDERS RESPONDS SWIFTLY TO ADVOCACY OF MARKET INCUMBENTS
  • RESULTS
    $1 TO $10 BILLION OF ANNUAL AVOIDED COST OPPORTUNITY FOR $300B US EDUCATION FACILITIES INDUSTRY

Interests

  • US TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER & ADVANCEMENT ACT
    pARENT LEGISLATION FOR INNOVATION & REGULATION
  • OMB CIRCULAR A-119
    FEDERAL AGENCY REGULATORY POLICY GUIDELINE
  • HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF 1965
    PARENT LEGISLATION FOR US EDUCATION INDUSTRY
  • #SMARTCAMPUS
    development of optimally interoperable base layer of industrial firmware for campus infrastructure

Skills

  • global standards advocacy
  • electrical engineering
  • writer  & SPEAKER
  • WEBsite DEVELOPMENT
  • dutch (semi-fluent)
  • mentorship & recruitment

Questions & Answers

Q1. Who is the "final fiduciary"?
The stakeholder in public infrastructure markets responsible for for safety, sustainability AND total cost of ownership. In the education industry this stakeholder is usually the oversight body such as an elected or appointed governing board -- the stakeholder who has responsibility for all dimensions of operation.

These oversight bodies are typically preoccupied with more politically visible issues facing their institutions than the DNA of the energy and information infrastructure of their campuses. While the branded "sustainability" workgroups in these institutions have familiarity with the specifics of campus life cycle cost they do not work at the DNA level.  They are primarily an extension of teaching enterprises; capturing instructional revenue or supporting institutional brand.  Virtually none of them have the interest, nor the tradition of effective advocacy in the consensus documents incorporated by reference into public law.  

 We ask: Do the regulations make sense in the first place?  (Or they reflect the market-making success of incumbent interests who build the cost of the product and/or service they sell to the public sector?)   A large part of the cost structure in education industry facilities is governed by codes and standards which are outdated and/or impractical.   The compliance and risk management enterprises are not charged with challenging the rules; they are charged with conforming to the rules.  Compliance stakeholders are neither culturally nor economically aligned with the stakeholder who roots out regulatory excess.

The weakness in the US standards system  -- and it is a lament you will hear among regulatory professionals in other nations -- is that the final fiduciary in the public sector only has enough money to fund compliance, accreditation, and/or conformity assessment activity; the activity that ostensibly contributes to the primary responsibility for public safety.

There is virtually no money to fund participation in  regulatory product development in the $300 billion education facilities industry in the US.   I can claim with confidence that I have guided regulatory advocacy that has resulted in 1 to 10 percent avoided cost opportunity for the facilities and operation enterprises for every college, university and school district in the United States.   

The slowness of the US standards system is not owed to any lack of effort by regulatory product developers.  It is owed to the lack of participation by the public sector final fiduciary -- not unlike the weakness of participatory democracy that we see in the regulatory processes of other nations.

Q2. What do you mean by "regulatory products"?

Consensus standards that are incorporated by reference into public law and the full suite of related accreditation, compliance and educational products that most standards developers need to stay in business. Codes and standards developed in the US consensus standards system are the "seed corn" for downstream revenue.  

The business model of the US consensus standard federation is under stress at the moment (not unlike the models of every other industry) but this system is the best we have at the moment.   It delivers more value -- faster -- than a system that permits legislators, their staffs, and donor to legislators and their staffs to write infrastructure regulations.  In the US, there is no government support of regulatory product development as there is in other nations. This characteristic is the strength and weakness of the US standards system.   

Q3. Don't education industry trade associations advocate in this space?

They do not. This space is too technical for political expects and too political for technical experts. Additionally:

  • There are hundreds of education industry trade associations competing for the same membership dollar.
  • The difficulty of reaching consensus among members, board of directors and permanent staff.
  • Their non-profit charter prohibits "lobbying" or other direct contact with legislators.
  • There is an inherent conflict of interest with their sponsors who make markets for products and services  at trade association gatherings.


Effectiveness in this space requires a business culture that is acclimated to a long term point of view common in long-cycle industries (such as the pharmaceutical and energy industry where 10-20 year innovation pipelines).   All colleges and university facility operations have a time horizon is typically the 3 year time frame of a construction project or a 5-year strategic plan.      

Trust me; I have catalyzed the creation of two of them, as listed above.  Trade associations are a partial solution to a wicked problem but not a total solution.   I continue to work collaboratively with most of them to help them become effective in this space.    

Q4. What do you mean by "wicked problem"?
It is a term of art I have borrowed from academics, among whom I have had considerable contact and collaboration over my 34 year career at the University of Michigan. A wicked problem is a social or cultural problem that is difficult or impossible to solve for as many as four reasons: incomplete or contradictory knowledge, the number of people and opinions involved, the large economic burden, and the interconnected nature of these problems with other problems.

I regard the difficulty of the public sector final fiduciary to assert its interest in the US standards system as one of its costliest unsolved problems. Price signals move very slowly.  In an election year when so much of the national conversation is about infrastructure renewal, regulatory product development processes that govern infrastructure ought to be front and center of that conversation.

Location

Ann Arbor, Michigan USA | DTW

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